Social Science in the News

The Wall Street Journal

As stock markets collapse and economic expansion declines, the Chinese people can at least count on resilience in one social trend: income inequality.

The Telegraph

The early stages of Alzheimer's disease could be detected by smell years before memory loss sets in, a study found.

NPR

In a new paper, a pair of researchers looked at the student records of tens of thousands of students at their university.

Huffington Post

If you're in the habit of clearing your emails outside of office hours you could be effectively cancelling out your annual leave.

The Guardian

Over the past few years, Twitter’s status as a platform for public debate is a dog-whistle platitude that has become the gilded shield of First-Amendment-waving journalists everywhere, like our very own #NotAllMen hashtag, to justify the mishandling – and, in some cases, even endangerment – of our sources for digital stories (and, yes, tweets should be considered sources).

BBC

World-class research and NHS staff training is under threat from higher education budget cuts, bodies representing universities have claimed.

The Guardian

The promise of starting anew in January gives us all hope to try to be better versions of ourselves.

BBC

David Cameron will call for a "more mature" conversation about mental health as he sets out how services in England will benefit from extra cash.

NDTV

Conspiracy theories, hoaxes and other variants of baloney have become so prevalent and intractable on Facebook that we no longer bother to debunk them.

The Guardian

The wage gap in the US could be making women ill, says a study showing women with lower incomes than their male counterparts are more likely to suffer from depression and anxiety.

UPI

The authors of a new study say they have disproved the "fat but fit" notion after finding in a large study that obesity cancels out the benefits of being at high aerobic fitness.

Times Higher

The “Deep Throat” investigation that led to the Watergate scandal has long fascinated me.

Third Sector

Suppose you hear of a new intervention that's never been tried or tested before.

The New York Times

ARE you in a panic, not sure what to get that special someone this year?

Huffington Post

Mobile devices and gadgets are now ubiquitous. According to Ofcom, at the beginning of 2015 in the UK, 93% of adults personally owned/used a mobile phone ‒ 66% of adults had a smartphone and 61% used their handset to access the Internet.

Daily Mail

A team of Duke University researchers compared the sleep habits of humans with hundreds of mammals, including primates, and found that humans sleep for significantly fewer hours than our closest relatives.

The Independent

The number of students who take arts subjects at GCSE level and beyond is declining and, according to The Cultural Learning Alliance, there are 13 per cent less students entering into arts GCSEs when compared with five years ago.

Boston Globe

Close grandparent-grandchild relationships are often a marker of strong family ties overall, but these intergenerational bonds also come with their own distinctive benefits, said lead author Sara Moorman, an associate professor of sociology at Boston College.

BBC

Obesity is the biggest threat to women's health and the health of future generations, warns England's chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies.

Politics Home

The charity Crisis commissioned a survey of more than 1,000 people in homeless hostels and day centres across the UK.

Times Higher

White students report lower levels of skill development than undergraduates from other ethnic backgrounds, according to the UK Engagement Survey.

Guardian

Jeremy Corbyn has been warned by one of Labour’s statistical experts that consultations on the views of party members must be free of the “statistical junk” the leadership produced on voters’ opinions of military involvement in Syria.

BBC

Vital care services for older and disabled people in England remain at risk - despite government attempts to protect the sector, care leaders say.

UPenn

You know them well. You might even be one of them.

Daily Mail

Dreading growing old may raise your risk of Alzheimer’s, scientists have warned.

Business Insider

New social science research offers a glimpse into the inner workings of impressive people with findings that help explain what makes some individuals more charismatic than others.

Forbes

There’s rather a lot of discussion around these days about the merits of a universal basic income.

The Conversation

The best innovations make life better. They may be life-saving technologies, health innovations or energy efficiency, all of which have a broad impact.

Cambridge

No-one knows how many human beings are trafficked each year.

SciDev.net

There is an “obsession with technology” and a “denigration” of critical thinking, ideas and debate in some countries in Africa and the developing world. This was the view expressed by Leszek Borysiewicz, vice-chancellor of the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom at the Cambridge-Africa day last week (23 October), an event that showcased examples of partnerships between researchers at the university and in Africa.

Times Higher

Female academics and those in arts, humanities and social science (AHSS) subjects engage and communicate with the public more than other scholars, a major report has found.

LSE

Immigration is a huge element of contemporary political debate, and it continues to divide and polarise opinion, while fuelling the rise of UKIP and other radical parties across Europe.

HUffington Post

Since May's general Election, there's one question I've been asked again and again - how did the polls get it so wrong that an apparent photo finish was actually a Conservative outright majority, an outcome that some forecasters had given a zero chance of happening?

BBC

A tax on sugary drinks should be introduced as part of a "bold and urgent" set of measures to tackle child obesity in England, MPs say.

BBC

"Very significant" government spending cuts will still be imposed before the next general election, an influential think tank has warned.

University of Bristol

There is no substantive evidence for a ‘pause’ or ‘hiatus’ in global warming and the use of those terms is therefore inaccurate, new research from the University of Bristol has found.

Huffington Post

The study of ecology will replace other required science courses and will be combined with learning math and social science, as needed.

The Guardian

As the year slouches towards its wintry extinction, a seasonal question recurs: what are the hottest new words?

University of Cambridge

Do the ethics of a person’s negotiating tactics differ when they negotiate with someone from a different country?

The Telegraph

Plans to charge for freedom of information requests are "undemocratic" and "draconian", a group of news publishers have warned.

Huffington Post

Tax credit cuts could see a "substantial rise" in the use of foodbanks, the country's largest provider of them has said.

The Guardian

House prices rose by 6.1% in the year to September 2015, according to the Office for National Statistics (ONS), with the average house price in the UK now £286,000.

UCL

New research led by UCL for the Cities Changing Diabetes partnership shows socio-cultural factors including time pressure, commuting time and where you live play significant roles in diabetes vulnerability.

EurekAlert

Research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) has found that people's honesty varies significantly between countries.

Huffington Post

What should the state do? That's the question we asked at our Shrinking Pains event on Tuesday morning.

University of Oxford

White working class boys from poor neighbourhoods face a 'double disadvantage' of low family income and place poverty linked to their wider community.

BBC

Cuts to adult mental health services in England have started damaging the quality of care given to patients, a report suggests.

The Guardian

A writing competition held by the Economic and Social Research Council asked PhD students to look 50 years into the future.

Times Higher

The triumph of the US and the UK in the Times Higher Education subject ranking for social sciences sends a “powerful warning” to policymakers to “tinker” with funding “at your peril”.

The Independent

Two years ago, academics analysed data from a survey of 325,00 adults and concluded there were seven distinct social classes in the modern British class system, as opposed to the traditional upper, middle and lower.

The Telegraph

Playing online games that exercise reasoning and memory skills could have major benefits for older people, a wide-scale study has found.

American Association for the Advancement of Science

The health facts presented by mass media in the midst of a disease outbreak are likely to influence what we remember about the disease -- new research suggests that the same mass media coverage may also influence the facts that we forget.

Science Magazine

In a year and a half, 2500 households in New York City may receive a startling request: to allow a team of scientists to monitor in intimate detail how they lead their lives over the course of 20 years—where they go, what they eat, who they talk to, what they buy, and how their bodies grow, change, and deteriorate.

CNN

From the paid parental leave one-upmanship by Silicon Valley companies to Democratic presidential candidates calling for guaranteed paid leave to Republicans arguing mandated paid leave could drive small businesses out of business, the issue is getting more attention in the United States.

New York Magazine

Want to know which parts of Williamsburg have the most 311 complaints for rat infestations before you decide on a new apartment?

Carnegie Mellon University

Fifteen years ago, a study showed that the brains of London cab drivers had an enlargement in the hippocampus, a brain area associated with navigation.

Politics Home

Last night the Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne signalled a rethink over tax credit reductions after a defeat in the House of Lords.

The Guardian

The impact of George Osborne’s changes to tax credits have been underlined by research that suggests two-thirds of working tax credit recipients will be worse off in 2020.

The Conversation

Female breadwinners are on the rise in all developed countries.

University of Cambridge

India is home to one of the most vibrant, engaged and mystifying democracies on the planet.

Bangor University

Leadership is an important aspect of everyday life as well, and we all choose leaders or at least, work with leaders.

Times Higher Education

Amid the continuing battle to contain Ebola, academic research has proved critical. But vaccine development is not the only contribution to have protected people from this lethal disease.

The Australian

In 1959, British novelist and physicist CP Snow, in his book The Two Cultures, dwelt on the danger of the increasing division that had grown up in the Western world since World War II between science and the humanities.

News Medical

Heavy drinkers and users of illegal drugs downplay their relative levels of consumption, when comparing themselves to others, reveals research by the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust.

New York Magazine

They say comparison is the thief of joy, and this, as it turns out, is one cliché that has a raft of empirical evidence backing it up.

BBC

A £1.24m UK study has begun to examine why so many patients fail to follow medical advice or stick with treatment.

Daily Mail

If you’re looking for reasons to be cheerful, then researchers have found one to top your list – happy people live longer.

BBC

The UK unemployment rate fell to a seven-year low of 5.4% in the three months to August, figures have shown.

The Conversation

With its long history of feudal oppression, industrial workhouses and dire slums, England is no stranger to deprivation.

International Business Times

When renowned Scottish economist Angus Deaton first came to the United States in the 1970s, he immediately noticed a lack of interest in income inequality, whether among academics, the general public or politicians.

The Independent

The proportion of workers who are not being paid the living wage is actually increasing, official statistics show.

National Post

After decades of carving the electorate into social, economic and ethnic groups, social science had finally discovered the voter who follows instinct.

New York Magazine

Starting at the end of this month, a group of 6,000 federal drug prisoners will be released early as part of the U.S. government’s ongoing effort to soften certain drug-sentencing guidelines.

The Independent

David Cameron is set to announce that the government is on a "national crusade" to get more homes built during his speech at the Conservative conference in Manchester on Wednesday.

Queen Mary University

Senior investment bankers don’t care what others think of them and don’t see their work as part of their identities, according to a study from Queen Mary University of London.

Cambridge University

Fully exploiting the Government’s education data could help to bridge the skills gap that is holding back UK businesses, Cambridge expert Professor Anna Vignoles has said at a Rustat Conference session on the application of Big Data, held at Jesus College.

University of Notre Dame

As anyone who has experienced it will attest, dealing with a boss who acts abusively can be a very difficult and confusing experience.

The Guardian

Government austerity measures have severely affected councils’ ability to carry out research in adult social care, a survey of local authority staff has found.

Economic Times

Favourable comments on Facebook about a political candidate can have a positive influence on potential voters' views of the candidate while unfavourable comments have a negative effect, a new study has found.

The Telegraph

The sharing economy and the blockchain are technological innovations that could pave the way for a new digital state, according to Cabinet Office minister Matthew Hancock MP.

The Conversation

When considering poverty, our national conversation tends to overlook systemic causes.

The Guardian

Sleep expert Dr Paul Kelley sounds a bit tired. He’s a morning type, which means he wakes at 6am after about eight hours of sleep.

University of East Anglia

Online campaigns about humanitarian crises need to be more surprising if they are to successfully engage the public, according to an academic from the University of East Anglia.

Nature

Funders and institutions increasingly prioritize research that addresses the challenges and opportunities of an inherently interdisciplinary world.

The Telegraph

The idea of burnout at work has been with us for decades. But recently, executive coaches and business psychologists have started talking about “brownout”, which is a sort of junior sibling.

BBC

Investing heavily in school computers and classroom technology does not improve pupils' performance, says a global study from the OECD.

The Guardian

Psychologist Iris Mauss at the University of California, Berkley found that the pursuit of happiness might just leave you worse off.

Cambridge University

New analysis of the London tube strike in February 2014 finds that it enabled a sizeable fraction of commuters to find better routes to work, and actually produced a net economic benefit.

National Georgraphic

A trove of bones hidden deep within a South African cave represents a new species of human ancestor, scientists announced Thursday in the journal eLife.

Times Higher Education

Female social scientists in the UK are not discriminated against when applying for grants, a major study of funding decisions in the area has concluded.

Cambridge University

New study using Facebook network data, including a dataset of over 57 billion friendships, shows correlation between higher social class and fewer international friendships.

The Guardian

School start times should be put back to as late as 11am to combat a sleep-deprivation crisis among young people, a scientist has suggested.

The Telegraph

Women who find long-term love with a protective older man have grannies to thank, a new study claims.

BBC

Some local authorities in England are not doing enough to prevent health problems in children under the age of five, a report suggests.

Huffington Post

Families on low incomes face a "decade of sharply declining living standards" as a result of George Osborne's Budget, according to a report published today by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

The Independent

Parents who exert too much control over their children could be causing them lifelong psychological damage, according to a study which tracked a group of people born in the 1940s until the present day.

Reuters

Teenagers who spend an extra hour a day surfing the internet, watching TV or playing computer games risk performing two grades worse in exams than their peers who don't, according to research by British scientists.

BBC

Some 3.7 million women - nearly three in 10 employees - will receive a pay rise by 2020 owing to the new National Living Wage, research suggests.

The Guardian

The number of workers on zero-hours contracts has increased by almost a fifth in the last year, sparking concerns that employers are increasingly turning to the controversial arrangements to cut back workers’ pay and conditions.

Oxford University

Emma Cohen, Arran Davis and Jacob Taylor, from the University’s Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology, carried out two experiments to look at how group exercise and social cohesion influence one another.